The Growth of Roots and Green Leaves of Allium cepa L. after the Removal of Different Parts of the Bulb

Abstract

The dynamics of the growth of roots and leaves of the Allium cepa L. after the mechanical removal of a part of the root system or the bulb was studied. It was shown that, after surgical interference, the potency for organogenesis is retained, although it is weakened.

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A. Budantsev, "The Growth of Roots and Green Leaves of Allium cepa L. after the Removal of Different Parts of the Bulb," American Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 4 No. 5, 2013, pp. 972-975. doi: 10.4236/ajps.2013.45120.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

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