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Dechicha, A. S., Bachi, F., Gharbi, I., Gourbdji, E., Baazize-Ammi, D. and Guetarni, D. (2015) Sero-Epidemiological Survey on Toxoplasmosis in Cattle, Sheep and Goats in Algeria. African Journal of Agricultural Research, 10, 2113-2119.
https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2015.9575

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Risk Factors and Co-Existence of Infectious Causes of Reproductive Failures in Selected Uganda Cattle and Goats: A Brucella spps-Toxoplasma gondii Study

    AUTHORS: Steven Kakooza, Maria Tumwebaze, Esther Nabatta, Joseph Byaruhanga, Dickson Stuart Tayebwa, Edward Wampande

    KEYWORDS: Reproductive Diseases, Abortion, Still Birth, Brucella spps and Toxoplasma gondii Prevalence, Uganda

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Access Library Journal, Vol.5 No.4, April 24, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Reproductive diseases are one of the most significant challenges in livestock breeding and production. The present study was done to determine the 1) sero-prevalence of Brucella spps and Toxoplasma gondii in bovine and caprine samples, 2) risk factors associated with sero-positivity, 3) occurrence of Brucella-T. gondii co-existence with emphasis on samples with a history of reproductive failure. To fulfill the stated objectives, a retrospective study was carried out in May, 2015 on livestock blood samples received by Central Diagnostic Laboratory for the period of February, 2014 to January, 2015. A total of 279 serum samples from livestock were submitted by farmers and veterinary practitioners for serological diagnostic tests. Of the total (279), 59 blood samples had sufficient bio-data crucial for their inclusion in the study and were screened for antibodies against Brucella spps using Standard Rose Bengal Antigen. Toxoplasma gondii infection was also confirmed by using multi species indirect ELISA Test kit. The overall Brucella and T. gondii serological prevalence derived from the samples was 49.2% and 3.4% respectively. A significant association was found between animal species (X2 = 3.836, P = 0.049), breed (X2 = 0.279, P = 0.041) and occurrence of Brucellosis. An overall prevalence of 3.8% mixed infection to Brucella spps and T. gondii in bovine samples was obtained where 2 animals which had previous occurrence of abortion were found positive. Information obtained from the study will add on already existing one in attempt to build a fulcrum for taming livestock reproductive failures a step to boosting productivity.