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National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Dis eases, “National Diabetes Statistics, 2011 Fact Sheet,” US Department of Health and Human Services, National In stitutes of Health, Bethesda, 2011.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Effect of Medical Advice for Diet on Diabetes Self-Management and Glycemic Control for Haitian and African Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    AUTHORS: Fatma G. Huffman, Joel C. Exebio, Joan A. Vaccaro, Gustavo G. Zarini, Zisca Dixon

    KEYWORDS: Dietary Medical Advice; Diabetes Self-Management; African American; Haitian American; Type 2 Diabetes; Glycemic Control

    JOURNAL NAME: Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol.4 No.11, October 7, 2013

    ABSTRACT: Adequate care of type 2 diabetes is reflected by the individual’s adherence to dietary guidance; yet, few patients are engaged in diabetes self-care at the recommended level, regardless of race/ethnicity. Few studies on the effect of dietary medical advice on diabetes self-management (DSM) and glycemic control have been conducted on Haitian and African American adults with type 2 diabetes. These relationships were assessed in total of 254 Blacks with type 2 diabetes (Haitian Americans = 129; African Americans = 125) recruited from Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida by community outreach methods. Although dietary advice received was not significantly different between the two Black ethnicities, given advice “to follow a diet” as a predictor of “using food groups” was significant for Haitian Americans, but not for African Americans. Haitian Americans who were advised to follow a diet were approximately 3 times more likely to sometimes or often use food groups (or exchange lists) in planning meals. Less than optimal glycemic control (A1C > 7.2) was inversely related to DSM for African Americans; but the relationship was not significant for Haitian Americans. A one unit increase in DSM score decreased the odds ratio point estimate of having less than optimal glycemic control (A1C > 7.2%) by a factor of 0.94 in African Americans. These results suggest that medical advice for diet plans may not be communicated effectively for DSM for some races/ethnicities. Research aimed at uncovering the enablers and barriers of diet management specific to Black ethnicities with type 2 diabetes is recommended.