Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook “Friends:” Social capitol and college students’ use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12, 1143-1168. doi:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Exploring Depression Symptom References on Facebook among College Freshmen: A Mixed Methods Approach

    AUTHORS: Megan A. Moreno, Lauren A. Jelenchick, Rajitha Kota

    KEYWORDS: Depression; College Student; Content Analysis; Mixed Methods; Facebook; Social Media

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Depression, Vol.2 No.3, August 2, 2013

    ABSTRACT: Depression is common among older adolescents and can be challenged to identify. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Facebook displayed depression references and their association with depression and peer perception. First-year college students’ Facebook profiles were categorized as Depression Displayers or Non-Displayers. Participants completed a depression screen and were interviewed regarding Facebook displayed depression references. Analyses included logistic regression and qualitative analysis. Among 132 participants (70% response rate), the average age was 18.4 years (SD 0.49) and approximately half were males (48.5%). Depression Displayers were twice as likely (OR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.01 - 4.5, p = 0.04) to meet clinical criteria for depression. Qualitative analysis revealed that depression references were viewed as support-seeking or attention-seeking. Displayed depression references were associated with depression; these disclosures may be support-seeking efforts subject to varying interpretations by peers.