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A. F. Howard, L. G. Balneaves, J. L. Bottorff and P. Rodney, “Preserving the Self: The Process of Decision Making about Hereditary Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Risk Reduction,” Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 21, 2011, pp. 502-519. doi:10.1177/1049732310387798

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Reasons for Prophylactic Mastectomy in Women Carrying BRCA 1/2 Mutation: A Systematic Literature Review

    AUTHORS: Manuel Machado, Sofia Braga

    KEYWORDS: BRCA 1; BRCA 2; Prophylactic Mastectomy; Decision Making

    JOURNAL NAME: Advances in Breast Cancer Research, Vol.2 No.3, July 4, 2013

    ABSTRACT: Although the majority of breast cancers are sporadic, it is estimated that between 5% and 10% of cases are hereditary and mostly associated with BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations. Women with BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation present up to 95% increased risk of breast cancer and are advised to take preventive measures. Surveillance, chemoprevention and prophylactic surgery (mastectomy and oophorectomy) are risk-reducing strategies. This literature review aims to respond to two major questions: 1) to what extent is the decision-making for prophylactic mastectomy in women with the BRCA mutation a more relevant option than other strategies, and 2) what are the major factors influencing the decision for mastectomy? For this purpose, 27 published articles were reviewed. Results show: a) the decision for mastectomy is more frequent in women carrying BRCA 1/2 mutation than in non-carriers; mastectomy being less frequent than oophorectomy; b) the decision-making is significantly associated with BRCA mutation, parity, age and family history; c) reasons underlying women decision-making relate to anxiety toward the risk of cancer, concerns with surgery, body-image and sexuality. It is discussed that, due to the complexity of the decision-making process, these cases require a careful and meticulous approach regarding information provided, and in addressing concerns.