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D. Morgan, H. Sylvester, F. L. Lucas and S. Miesfeldt, “Cancer Prevention and Screening Practices among Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer after Genetic Counseling in the Community Setting,” Familial Cancer, Vol. 8, 2009, pp. 277-287. doi:10.1007/s10689-009-9242-z

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Reasons for Prophylactic Mastectomy in Women Carrying BRCA 1/2 Mutation: A Systematic Literature Review

    AUTHORS: Manuel Machado, Sofia Braga

    KEYWORDS: BRCA 1; BRCA 2; Prophylactic Mastectomy; Decision Making

    JOURNAL NAME: Advances in Breast Cancer Research, Vol.2 No.3, July 4, 2013

    ABSTRACT: Although the majority of breast cancers are sporadic, it is estimated that between 5% and 10% of cases are hereditary and mostly associated with BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations. Women with BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation present up to 95% increased risk of breast cancer and are advised to take preventive measures. Surveillance, chemoprevention and prophylactic surgery (mastectomy and oophorectomy) are risk-reducing strategies. This literature review aims to respond to two major questions: 1) to what extent is the decision-making for prophylactic mastectomy in women with the BRCA mutation a more relevant option than other strategies, and 2) what are the major factors influencing the decision for mastectomy? For this purpose, 27 published articles were reviewed. Results show: a) the decision for mastectomy is more frequent in women carrying BRCA 1/2 mutation than in non-carriers; mastectomy being less frequent than oophorectomy; b) the decision-making is significantly associated with BRCA mutation, parity, age and family history; c) reasons underlying women decision-making relate to anxiety toward the risk of cancer, concerns with surgery, body-image and sexuality. It is discussed that, due to the complexity of the decision-making process, these cases require a careful and meticulous approach regarding information provided, and in addressing concerns.