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E. Bergeret, J. Gaubert, P. Pannie and J. M. Gaultierr, “Modeling and Design of CMOS UHF Voltage Multiplier for RFID in an EEPROM Compatible Process,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems-I, Vol. 54, No. 10, 2007, pp. 833-837. doi:10.1109/TCSII.2007.902222

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Optimization of the Voltage Doubler Stages in an RF-DC Convertor Module for Energy Harvesting

    AUTHORS: Kavuri Kasi Annapurna Devi, Norashidah Md. Din, Chandan Kumar Chakrabarty

    KEYWORDS: Energy Conversion; RF; Schottky Diode; Villard; Energy Harvesting

    JOURNAL NAME: Circuits and Systems, Vol.3 No.3, June 25, 2012

    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an optimization of the voltage doubler stages in an energy conversion module for Radio Frequency (RF) energy harvesting system at 900 MHz band. The function of the energy conversion module is to convert the (RF) signals into direct-current (DC) voltage at the given frequency band to power the low power devices/circuits. The design is based on the Villard voltage doubler circuit. A 7 stage Schottky diode voltage doubler circuit is designed, modeled, simulated, fabricated and tested in this work. Multisim was used for the modeling and simulation work. Simulation and measurement were carried out for various input power levels at the specified frequency band. For an equivalent incident signal of –40 dBm, the circuit can produce 3mV across a 100 k? load. The results also show that there is a multiplication factor of 22 at 0 dBm and produces DC output voltage of 5.0 V in measurement. This voltage can be used to power low power sensors in sensor networks ultimately in place of batteries.