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van Sluijs, E. M., McMinn, A. M., & Griffin, S. J. (2007). Effectiveness of interventions to promote physical activity in children and adolescents: Systematic review of controlled trials. British Medical Journal, 335.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Efficacy and Feasibility of the “Girls’ Recreational Activity Support Program Using Information Technology”: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    AUTHORS: Tracey L. Kelty, Philip J. Morgan, David R. Lubans

    KEYWORDS: Physical Activity; Adolescent Girls; Intervention; Internet

    JOURNAL NAME: Advances in Physical Education, Vol.2 No.1, February 16, 2012

    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effects of the Girls Recreational Activity Support Program Using Information Technology (GRASP-IT) intervention. This group randomized controlled trial for older adolescent girls (15 years+) combined face-to-face sessions with the use of a social network website, Facebook. Baseline and follow-up measurements were taken for physical activity (5 day pedometer), height, weight, estimated VO2max (Queen’s College Step Test), self-efficacy and peer social support. A process evaluation was conducted and included questionnaires and focus groups interviews. Although, the intervention group increased physical activity (mean 1878 steps/day) the difference between groups was not significant (p = 0.11, d = 0.8). BMI, fitness, self-efficacy and peer support all improved for the intervention group, however, changes were not statistically significant between groups. Although participants enjoyed the face-to- face component, engagement with the on-line component was low. Future interventions that utilize Facebook as a medium for increasing physical activity for adolescent girls require additional strategies to improve engagement and compliance.