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Yoo, M.H., Yang, C.J., Kim, S.A., Park, M.J., Ahn, J.H., Chung, J.W. and Park, H.J. (2017) Efficacy of Steroid Therapy Based on Symptomatic and Functional Improvement in Patients with Vestibular Neuritis: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 274, 2443-2451.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-017-4556-1

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Vestibular Rehabilitation for the Patients with Intractable Vestibular Neuritis

    AUTHORS: Hiroaki Ichijo

    KEYWORDS: Video-Oculography, Caloric Testing, Vestibular Compensation, Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    JOURNAL NAME: International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Vol.7 No.6, November 14, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Objective: To clarify whether vestibular rehabilitation is effective in improving spontaneous nystagmus in patients with intractable vestibular neuritis. Methods: The subjects were 8 patients (6 females and 2 males) with vestibular neuritis who revealed long-lasting (more than 2 months since the onset) horizontal spontaneous nystagmus toward the healthy side. We used thumbs-up head shaking for vestibular rehabilitation. This exercise involves active head shaking (1 Hz) while staring at one’s thumb nail. One set is 10 cycles. We asked the patient to do 3 sets (morning, afternoon, and night) every day. Results: The mean value of the slow-phase velocity of spontaneous nystagmus before treatment was 4.1°/s, and that 3 months after vestibular rehabilitation was 4.1°/s. No improvement was observed. Conclusion: Vestibular rehabilitation is not always effective in improving spontaneous nystagmus in patients with intractable vestibular neuritis. Therefore, clinicians should consider the possibility of long-term incomplete central compensation.