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Einstein, A. (1905) über die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der Wärme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Flüssigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Annalen der Physik (In German), 322, 549-560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/andp.19053220806

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Review: Adducts and Clusters in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry and Nature

    AUTHORS: Ilia Brondz

    KEYWORDS: Clusters, Adducts, Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, Icosahedral Structures

    JOURNAL NAME: International Journal of Analytical Mass Spectrometry and Chromatography, Vol.4 No.2, June 29, 2016

    ABSTRACT: The word “clusters” in scientific terminology as aggregated molecules or atoms appeared in chemistry relatively recently. The terms clusters have been used intensively since the discovery of fullerenes. The term cluster is not a new one for other branches of science such as astrophysics-star cluster, globular cluster, galaxy cluster, in biology and medicine-cancer cluster, genetic cluster, or in computing-data cluster. Adducts in chemistry were known significantly earlier. Both clusters and adducts are assemblies of atoms or molecules that are held together by weak van der Waals or London dispersion forces. Clusters are homogeneous and usually consist of one sort of atom or molecule. Clusters can also be a host for other types of atoms or molecules. Adducts usually consist of two different types of molecules, one of which is the host molecule. Both clusters and adducts are well defined by IUPAC. The present short review describes some important phenomena of these intriguing associations, which have interest for chemical extraction, separation, analysis, and for nature in general.