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Costa, P. and McCrae, R. (1980) Influence of Extraversion and Neuroticism on Subjective Well-Being: Happy and Unhappy People. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 668-678. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.38.4.668

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: An Exploratory Analysis of the Relationships between Personality Characteristics and the Perceptions of Virtual Merchandising

    AUTHORS: Al Bellamy, Julie Becker

    KEYWORDS: Virtual Merchandising, Symbolic Interaction Theory, Personality Factors, Shopping Attitudes

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.3 No.3, March 16, 2015

    ABSTRACT: This study explored the relationship between individual’s perception of presence within a virtual merchandising environment and their attitudes toward virtual shopping. Symbolic interactionism was used as the theoretical framework. Utilizing four of the Big Five personality framework, it also examined if individual’s personality affected their attitude toward virtual shopping as well as the relationship between presence and attitudes toward online shopping. The study was conducted among 81 students enrolled in an undergraduate Apparel Textiles and Merchandising Program at a university located in Southeastern Michigan. Results indicate a positive correlation between perceptions of presence and individual willingness to make purchases within an online shopping environment as well as their overall satisfaction with shopping in such an environment. Two of the personality factors from the Big Five personality framework, neuroticism and extroversion, were shown to moderate these relationships. Overall, the study confirmed the idea that individual personality traits affect one’s disposition towards shopping within a virtual environment.