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Killen, J.D., Hayward, C., Wilson, D.M., Haydel, K.F., Robinson, T.N., Taylor, C.B., et al. (1996) Predicting Onset of Drinking in a Community Sample of Adolescents: The Role of Expectancy and Temperament. Addictive Behaviors, 21, 473-480. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0306-4603(95)00077-1

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Consequences of Low Risk and Hazardous Alcohol Consumption among University Students in Australia and Implications for Health Promotion Interventions

    AUTHORS: Sharyn Burns, Gemma Crawford, Jonathan Hallett, Jonine Jancey, Linda Portsmouth, Kristen Hunt, Janelle Longo

    KEYWORDS: Alcohol, University Student, Hazardous Consumption, Harms, Expectancies

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol.5 No.1, January 14, 2015

    ABSTRACT: Background: Hazardous alcohol consumption and associated harms are high among young uni- versity students. The university environment is conducive to excessive alcohol consumption with studies finding young university students to drink alcohol at higher levels than their non-university peers. Methods: A random sample of 18 - 24-year-old undergraduate, internal university students completed a survey (n = 2465) to investigate differences in self-reported personal, second-hand and witnessed alcohol-related harms, alcohol expectancies, pre-loading, and friends’ alcohol consumption between low risk and hazardous drinkers. Univariate and multivariate analyses are reported. Results: Almost 40% of students who had consumed alcohol in the past year reported drinking at hazardous levels. Univariate analyses found students who reported hazardous drinking reported significantly higher scores relating to experienced, second-hand, witnessed and academic problems compared to low risk drinkers. Hazardous drinkers were also more likely to pre-load, to drink at higher levels when pre-loading, have more friends who drank alcohol, have more friends who drank at hazardous levels and to score higher on alcohol expectancies. However both low risk and hazardous drinkers experienced a range of harms due to their own drinking including hangover (71.2%), unprotected sex (19.3%), regretted sex (16.8%) and drink-driving (17%). Looking after an intoxicated student (34.3%) and witnessing someone pass out (37.5%) were issues for all drinkers. Experienced alcohol related harms, academic problems, alcohol expectancies, close friends’ level of alcohol consumption, pre-loading in the last four weeks and level of consumption when pre-loading were predictors of hazardous drinking (p