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Funk, J. B., Daldacci, H. B., Pasold, T., & Baumgardner, J. (2004). Violence Exposure in Real-Life, Video Games, Television, Movies, and the Internet: Is There Desensitization? Journal of Adolescence, 27, 23-39.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2003.10.005

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Relationship between Video Game Violence and Long-Term Neuropsychological Outcomes

    AUTHORS: Yoshiyuki Tamamiya, Goh Matsuda, Kazuo Hiraki

    KEYWORDS: Violent Media, Facial Expression Recognition, Aggression, Event-Related Potential (ERP)

    JOURNAL NAME: Psychology, Vol.5 No.13, September 10, 2014

    ABSTRACT: The current study examined the long-term effects of video game violence on aggressiveness and facial expression recognition using multiple measures. In Experiment 1, participants unfamiliar with video games were randomly assigned to play a violent or nonviolent video game for four weeks. Before and after the game play interval, event-related potentials (ERP) evoked by facial expressions were recorded, and aggressiveness was measured with a questionnaire. Results showed that playing a violent video game delayed peak latency of a positive component of the ERP evoked by angry faces and increased aggressiveness among male participants. Experiment 2 included a 3-month follow-up assessment. Results showed preservation of delayed neural activity, while levels of aggressiveness diminished to some extent. These findings highlight differential aspects regarding the long-term effects of playing a violent video game: more enduring for facial expression recognition and short-lived for aggressiveness.