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Obajimi, M.O, Atalabi, M.O., Ogbole, G.I., Adeniji-Sofoluwe, A.T., Adekanmi, A.J., et al. (2008) Abdominal Ultrasound in HIV/AIDS Patients in Southwestren Nigeria. BMC Medical Imaging, 8, 5.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Abdominal Sonographic Findings in Severely Immunosuppressed Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Treated for Tuberculosis

    AUTHORS: Harriet Nalubega Kisembo, Michael Grace Kawooya, Chris Kenyon, William Worodria, Robert Colebunders

    KEYWORDS: Abdominal Sonography, Severe Immunosuppression, HIV-TB Co-Infection

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Tuberculosis Research, Vol.2 No.2, June 6, 2014

    ABSTRACT: Objective: We describe the abdominal sonographic findings among patients with HIV-tuberculosis (TB) co-infection with advanced immune suppression before initiation of ART and relate these findings to the patients’ abdominal symptoms and CD4 T-cell count. Methods: Consecutive HIV-TB co-infected patients, qualifying for ART, were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study at the Mulago National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme clinic in Kampala, Uganda. An abdominal ultrasound was performed at enrolment. Results: A total of 209 HIV-TB co-infected patients (76% with pulmonary, 19% with extrapulmonary TB and 5% with extrapulmonary and pulmonary TB) underwent an abdominal ultrasound scan. Only 49 patients (23.4%) had a normal abdominal ultrasound. The following sonographic abnormalities were found: multiple lymphadenopathy (38%), splenomegaly (18%), renal abnormalities (14%), gastro-intestinal tract abnormalities (thickened bowel loops, appendicitis) (13%), splenic abscesses (13%) and ascites (6%). The commonest groups of enlarged lymph nodes were in the porta-hepatis (19%) and peripancreatic (17%) area and 80% of the enlarged lymph nodes were hypoechoic. Conclusion: Most patients with advanced immune suppression and HIV-TB co-infection have sonographic evidence of generalized TB with abdominal involvement, therefore Ultrasound may assist in the early diagnosis of disseminated TB.