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Akers, T.A. and Lanier, M.M. (2009) Health Policy and Ethics Epidemiological Criminology: Coming Full Circle. American Journal of Public Health, 99, 397-402. http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2008.139808

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Differences in Mean Number of Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Words Decoded between Letter-Sound Readers and Non Letter-Sound Readers

    AUTHORS: Gail M. Wolf

    KEYWORDS: Letter-Sound Reading, Decoding, Automaticity, Practicing Reading

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Nursing, Vol.4 No.6, May 26, 2014

    ABSTRACT: Children’s failure to develop simple word decoding skills in early years is linked to future poor reading, school dropout, and poor health [1] [2]. Letter-sound knowledge is needed for word decoding development; however questions remain on what types of letter-sound knowledge help children decode simple words [3]. This study investigated the differences in mean number of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words decoded between two groups of children, a letter-sound reading group and non letter-sound reading group. Children aged 4 to 6 in both groups, attempted to decode a variety of simple words such as tan, sit, hen, pig, dot, and fun. Analysis determined word decoding differences existed between the two groups. The alternate hypothesis was accepted; the letter-sound reading group had a significantly higher mean in number of consonant-vowel-consonant words decoded compared to the non letter-sound reading group. The study informs the teaching approaches needed to improve early decoding skills showing letter-sound reading ability is an important step for learning to decode simple consonant-vowel-consonant words.