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Debrand, T. and Lengagne, P. (2007) Pénibilité au travail et santé des seniors en Europe? [Stress at Work and the Health of Older Workers in Europe?] Economic Statistics, 403, 19-38.
https://doi.org/10.3406/estat.2007.7086

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: What Is the Role of Work-Related Factors in Self-Reported Health Inequalities among Employed Individuals? A Longitudinal Study in Luxembourg

    AUTHORS: Anastase Tchicaya, Nathalie Lorentz, Kristell Leduc

    KEYWORDS: Employment, Health Inequalities, Working Conditions, EU-SILC, Work-Related Factors, Self-Reported Health

    JOURNAL NAME: Health, Vol.10 No.9, September 5, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Objectives: We measured health inequalities among employed Luxembourg residents over time and the socio-economic and work-related determinants. Design and Setting: Longitudinal data were obtained from the Socio-economic Liewen zu Lëtzebuerg/European Union Survey on Income and Living Conditions, which has been conducted each year since 2003 in Luxembourg. Participants: Participants comprised 727 Luxembourg residents (58% men), aged between 21 and 55 years in 2003, who were employed between 2003 and 2012. Primary and Secondary Outcomes Measured: The variable of interest was self-reported health. We used transition indicators on work-related factors to consider changes that individuals may have experienced in their job over this period. Results: People who moved from a part-time to a full-time contract (odds ratio (OR): 5.52, confidence interval (CI): 1.55 - 19.73), and those who moved from the 3rd or 4th quartile of earnings to the 1st or 2nd quartile (OR: 2.48, CI: 1.02 - 6.05) between 2003 and 2012, had a higher risk of being in poor health in 2012. The risk of deterioration in self-reported health in 2012 among people who were healthy in 2003 was associated with the type of contract, economic activity, and occupation. Conclusion: Health inequalities occur among employed people in Luxembourg. Their importance varies according to work-related characteristics and economic activity. Our findings showed that declined health status was associated with contract type, profession, and economic activity. This suggests that measures should be taken to maintain good health for people working in these specific occupations or economic sectors (e.g. preventive action, reduction of risk exposure, change of occupation in the same company, and so on).