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First Masquerading as Gallstones, Pulmonary Hypertension Mimics PE

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DOI: 10.4236/crcm.2015.412076    3,398 Downloads   3,776 Views  

ABSTRACT

Patients presenting to emergency and urgent care centers with calf pain after long and short-haul flights are a common presentation throughout Europe. Patients fitting an epidemiological risk profile for cholelithiasis and presenting with right upper quadrant abdominal pain can also be a common presentation fitting of a specific patient profile. However, pulmonary hypertension can present in a nuanced and possible missed chronic and acute presentation. The patient case we present profiles a mildly obese 54-year-old Caucasian woman and recent holiday maker with unilateral calf pain and shortness of breath after traveling on a long-haul flight with tertiary symptoms of indigestion and epigastric discomfort indicative of gastroenteritis. This case highlights the required diligence for emergency physicians to maintain a high index of suspicion and broad differential diagnosis in the undifferentiated patient with seemingly common or classic presentations. We find that a serendipitous definitive diagnosis is made by following a systematic and organized approach.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Quinn, J. , Ukwatta, S. , Luke, C. , Zeleny, T. and Bencko, V. (2015) First Masquerading as Gallstones, Pulmonary Hypertension Mimics PE. Case Reports in Clinical Medicine, 4, 376-380. doi: 10.4236/crcm.2015.412076.

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