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The practice of essential nutrition actions in healthcare deliveries of Shebedino District, South Ethiopia

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DOI: 10.4236/arsci.2014.21002    3,268 Downloads   5,967 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The essential nutrition actions explain nutrition through life cycle approach addressing women’s nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, optimal infant and young children feeding, nutritional care for sick children and control of anemia, iodine and vitamin A deficiencies. Essential nutrition action has been implemented and resulted in positive outcome in less developed countries. However, the status of practice and associated factors were not studied in Ethiopia. Thus, institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the practice of essential nutrition actions in healthcare deliveries of Shebedino District, South Ethiopia. Quantitative data were collected though face-to-face interview with health workers and triangulated with data obtained through in-depth interview with health managers in the district and non-participatory observation of client-provider interaction in health facilities. Data were analyzed using SPSS16.0 software. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were undertaken. The study revealed that 61 (56.0%) health workers practiced essential nutrition actions. Seventy one (65.1%) health workers were trained on essential nutrition actions. The practice of essential nutrition actions was associated with career structure of the health workers (AOR = 6.79, 95%CI: 2.31, 19.98), essential nutrition actions knowledge of health workers (AOR = 6.87, 95%CI: 2.11, 21.51) and availability of monthly nutrition related report form (AOR = 4.95, 95%CI: 1.46, 16.81). The practice of essential nutrition actions was low. The factors affecting the practice were inadequate training and knowledge of essential nutrition actions, career structure of the health workers and availability of monthly report form. Training should be provided for health workers on essential nutrition actions; moreover, essential nutrition actions indicators should be included in monthly report forms of the health institutions.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Bolka, H. and Abajobir, A. (2014) The practice of essential nutrition actions in healthcare deliveries of Shebedino District, South Ethiopia. Advances in Reproductive Sciences, 2, 8-15. doi: 10.4236/arsci.2014.21002.

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