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Individual Essences in Avicenna’s Metaphysics

DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.41004    5,767 Downloads   6,953 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Central to Aristotle’s metaphysics is the question of individuality. The individuality of each substance is explained in relation to matter because the form is universal. Avicenna, as one of the Aristotelian Neoplatonist philosophers, is not content with this explanation and proposes to establish individuality on other grounds. In this paper, I argue that in his perspective it is not the matter which determines individuality but rather the principle of existence.

 

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Kamal, M. (2014). Individual Essences in Avicenna’s Metaphysics. Open Journal of Philosophy, 4, 16-21. doi: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.41004.

References

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