From Age-Sets to Friendship Networks in Comparative Sociology: The continuity of soda among the Boorana of East Africa

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DOI: 10.4236/sm.2011.11002   PDF   HTML     7,004 Downloads   12,679 Views   Citations

Abstract

This paper re-assesses a comparative sociology of kinship and friendship in East Africa with a particular focus on the Boorana Oromo of Kenya. It argues that the study of kinship dominated the developments of a comparative sociology during colonial times and that the post-colonial influences of war, the market and globalization have increased the role of the individual. As a result a comparative sociology of African kinship needs to be understood in relation to comparative sociological studies of friendship in East Africa, particularly associated with the sociology of education.

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Aguilar, M. (2011). From Age-Sets to Friendship Networks in Comparative Sociology: The continuity of soda among the Boorana of East Africa. Sociology Mind, 1, 16-25. doi: 10.4236/sm.2011.11002.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

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