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Selection of Landscape Tree Species of Tolerant to Sulfur Dioxide Pollution in Subtropical China

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DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2013.34017    4,705 Downloads   8,031 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major air pollutant, especially in developing countries. Many trees are seriously impaired by SO2, while other species can mitigate air pollution by absorbing this gas. Planting appropriate tree species near industrial complexes is critical for aesthetic value and pollution mitigation. In this study, six landscape tree species typical of a subtropical area were investigated for their tolerance of SO2: Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl., Ilex rotunda Thunb., Lysidice rhodostegia Hance, Ceiba insignis (Kunth) P. E. Gibbs & Semir, Cassia surattensis Burm. f., and Michelia chapensis Dandy. We measured net photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, leaf sulfur content, relative water content, relative proline content, and other parameters under 1.31 mg·m-3 SO2 fumigation for eight days. The results revealed that the six species differed in their biochemical characteristics under SO2 stress. Based on these data, the most appropriate species for planting in SO2 polluted areas was I. rotunda, because it grew normally under SO2 stress and could absorb SO2.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Zhang, X. , Zhou, P. , Zhang, W. , Zhang, W. & Wang, Y. (2013). Selection of Landscape Tree Species of Tolerant to Sulfur Dioxide Pollution in Subtropical China. Open Journal of Forestry, 3, 104-108. doi: 10.4236/ojf.2013.34017.

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