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Acquisition of Avoidance Responding in the Fmr1 Knockout Mouse

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2010.15045    4,305 Downloads   7,373 Views  

ABSTRACT

Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation. Much work has been done characterizing the behavioral phenotype of the animal model of FXS, the Fmr1 knockout mouse. However, very little literature exists on knockout performance in the active avoidance task. This study evaluated if Fmr1 knockouts differed from wild type littermates in avoidance acquisition. Data revealed no difference in acquisition between knockouts and wild types.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Valdovinos, M. , Ippolito, K. , Nawrocki, L. , Woods, G. & Wrenn, C. (2010). Acquisition of Avoidance Responding in the Fmr1 Knockout Mouse. Psychology, 1, 367-369. doi: 10.4236/psych.2010.15045.

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