Correlation, Regression and Path Analyses of Seed Yield Components in Crambe abyssinica, a Promising Industrial Oil Crop

DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.41007   PDF   HTML   XML   5,257 Downloads   7,908 Views   Citations

Abstract

In the present study correlation, regression and path analyses were carried out to decide correlations among the agro- nomic traits and their contributions to seed yield per plant in Crambe abyssinica. Partial correlation analysis indicated that plant height (X1) was significantly correlated with branching height and the number of first branches (P < 0.01); Branching height (X2) was significantly correlated with pod number of primary inflorescence (P < 0.01) and number of secondary branches (P < 0.05) and negatively correlated with number of first branches (P < 0.01); Number of first branches (X3) was significantly correlated with number of secondary branches (P < 0.01), pod number per plant and 1000-grain weight (P < 0.05); Number of secondary branches (X4) was significantly correlated with seed yield per plant (P < 0.05); Pod number per plant (X7) was significantly correlated with seed yield per plant (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with 1000-grain weight (P < 0.01); 1000-grain weight (X8) was significantly correlated with seed yield per plant (P < 0.01). Stepwise regression and path analyses indicated that only pod number per plant and 1000-grain weight contributed significantly to seed yield per plant at P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively. The regression formula for contributions of pod number per plant (X7) and 1000-grain weight (X8) to seed yield per plant (Y) is Y = 0.006 X7 + 1.222 X8 - 7.191. The path coefficient of pod number per plant to seed yield per plant was 0.967 and that of 1000-grain weight was 0.194. The determination coefficient of pod number per plant and 1000-grain weight to seed yield per plant was 0.983 and the determination coefficient of other agronomic traits was 0.130. Coefficient of variance indicated that the length of primary inflorescence showed the greatest variation, followed by seed yield per plant, pod number per plant, number of secondary branches, branching height, pod number of primary inflorescence, number of first branches, seed yield per plot, 1000-grain weight and plant height. It was suggested that seed yield per plant in Crambe might be improved by increasing the pod number per plant through selection or cultivation, but the negative correlation between pod number per plant and 1000-grain weight also needs to be considered.

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B. Huang, Y. Yang, T. Luo, S. Wu, X. Du, D. Cai and B. Huang, "Correlation, Regression and Path Analyses of Seed Yield Components in Crambe abyssinica, a Promising Industrial Oil Crop," American Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 4 No. 1, 2013, pp. 42-47. doi: 10.4236/ajps.2013.41007.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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