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Effects of Supersonic Nozzle Geometry on Characteristics of Shock Wave Structure

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DOI: 10.4236/ojfd.2012.24A019    5,072 Downloads   9,637 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Interaction between the normal shock wave and the turbulent boundary layer in a supersonic nozzle becomes complex with an increase of a Mach number just before the shock wave. When the shock wave is strong enough to separate the boundary layer, the shock wave is bifurcated, and the 2nd and 3rd shock waves are formed downstream of the shock wave. The effect of a series of shock waves thus formed, called shock train, is considered to be similar to the effect of one normal shock wave, and the shock train is called pseudo-shock wave. There are many researches on the configuration of the shock wave. However, so far, very few researches have been done on the asymmetric characteristics of the leading shock wave in supersonic nozzles. In the present study, the effect of nozzle geometry on asymmetric shock wave in supersonic nozzles has been investigated experimentally.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

S. Matsuo, K. Kanesaki, J. Nagao, M. Khan, T. Setoguchi and H. Kim, "Effects of Supersonic Nozzle Geometry on Characteristics of Shock Wave Structure," Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 2 No. 4A, 2012, pp. 181-186. doi: 10.4236/ojfd.2012.24A019.

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