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Association between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Knowledge and Lifestyle

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DOI: 10.4236/fns.2011.210140    6,661 Downloads   10,593 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Objective: To relate cardiovascular risk factor knowledge to lifestyle. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, food consumption and lifestyle characteristics were recorded using mailed questionnaires. The dietary pattern was described using the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). An open ended questionnaire without predefined choices or answers was used to capture cardiovascular knowledge. Results: Lack of physical activity, smoking and eating too much fat were the 3 most cited potential cardiovascular risk factors, while being overweight, eating too much salt and a low consumption of fruits and vegetables were the least cited risk factors. Age, Body Mass Index, physical activity, smoking, income and dietary habits were not consistently associated with knowledge of risk factors. A low socioeconomic position as measured by the indicator education was associated with a lower knowledge of established and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Risk factor knowledge, an essential step in prevention of CVD, is not systematically associated with a healthier lifestyle. The findings of this study confirm that there is a gap between risk factor knowledge and lifestyle.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

P. Mullie and P. Clarys, "Association between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Knowledge and Lifestyle," Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol. 2 No. 10, 2011, pp. 1048-1053. doi: 10.4236/fns.2011.210140.

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