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Cepstral and linear prediction techniques for improving intelligibility and audibility of impaired speech

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DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2010.31013    4,058 Downloads   7,838 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Human speech becomes impaired i.e., unintelligible due to a variety of reasons that can be either neurological or anatomical. The objective of the research was to improve the intelligibility and audibility of the impaired speech that resulted from a disabled human speech mechanism with impairment in the acoustic system-the supra-laryngeal vocal tract. For this purpose three methods are presented in this paper. Method 1 was to develop an inverse model of the speech degradation using the Cepstral technique. Method 2 was to replace the degraded vocal tract response by a normal vocal tract response using the Cepstral technique. Method 3 was to replace the degraded vocal tract response by a normal vocal tract response using the Linear Prediction technique.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Ravindran, G. , Shenbagadevi, S. and Selvam, V. (2010) Cepstral and linear prediction techniques for improving intelligibility and audibility of impaired speech. Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, 3, 85-94. doi: 10.4236/jbise.2010.31013.

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