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The Disregarded HIV Prevention Strategies—Their Potential to Uphold the Pandemic, and the Challenges Facing Societies

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DOI: 10.4236/wja.2018.84011    548 Downloads   1,422 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

The ongoing spread of HIV after sobering news about the goal End of AIDS is not encouraging, apart from regional differences. We focus on the consequences of the two essentially failed HIV prevention strategies in certain countries. The first failed because the correct messages concerning preventive behavior did not reach the required levels of target populations to interrupt HIV infection chains. There was a lack of appropriate framework conditions for the target populations to engage in the required scale. The additional biomedical strategy Treatment as Prevention didn’t achieve the breakthrough as was hoped. The consequences thereof affect the financial burden on societies, which can take several decades. We draw attention to the unbalanced principles of proportionality to which governments are committed, but which are practiced in favor of those vulnerable people; these people abuse their autonomy and contribute to the further spread of HIV at the expense of financial burdens, social and medical care systems; this behavior is tolerated, although the transmission of HIV is mostly preventable. We point to extreme tendencies, such as the chem-sex settings, whose unswayable participants engage in indirect violence against the societies. Another possible consequence of the still uncontrolled spread of HIV is the potential for HIV to increase its virulence.

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Dennin, R. , Sinn, A. and Du, Z. (2018) The Disregarded HIV Prevention Strategies—Their Potential to Uphold the Pandemic, and the Challenges Facing Societies. World Journal of AIDS, 8, 137-159. doi: 10.4236/wja.2018.84011.

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