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Bile Acid Effects on Placental Damage in Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

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DOI: 10.4236/jbm.2018.66003    463 Downloads   1,231 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

Aims: The abnormal increase of bile acid is found in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). It also can be observed the damage of placental tissue in ICP. The aim of this study was to find the associations of the bile acid in umbilical vein and the damage of placental tissue. Methods: Thirty women diagnosed with ICP and fifty normal pregnant women between September 2015 and September 2017 at Nanshan District Maternity & Child Healthcare Hospital of Shenzhen were included in this study. The glycocholic acid (GA), total bile acids (TBA), total bilirubin (TB), direct bilirubin (DB) and albumin level in umbilical vein were measured by cycle enzyme method in ICP and control group. The placental damage was analyzed by morphologic study using hematoxylin dyes in two groups. The correlation between the level of the bile acid in the umbilical vein and the damage of the placenta was assessed using SPSS software. Results: The GA, TBA, TB, DB and albumin level in umbilical vein were significantly higher in ICP than those of pregnant women, respectively. The placental villis were expanded and the structure was destroyed in ICP. The vessel was damaged and the cell trophoblast hyperplasia in ICP. It also can be seen that there was obvious nodules and a typical fibrous necrotic substance in ICP but not in control group. There is a positive correlation between the level of the TBA in the umbilical vein and the damage of the placenta in ICP. Conclusion: The TBAs were significantly higher in umbilical vein and were related to the placental damage in ICP.

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Xie, F. , Liu, X. , Xiao, P. , Huang, Y. , Chen, Q. and Zhou, L. (2018) Bile Acid Effects on Placental Damage in Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy. Journal of Biosciences and Medicines, 6, 42-52. doi: 10.4236/jbm.2018.66003.

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