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Investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Resistance Pattern against Antibiotics in Clinical Samples from Iranian Educational Hospital

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DOI: 10.4236/aim.2016.63019    1,797 Downloads   2,451 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeroginosa) is one of the opportunistic pathogens, which is the main cause of prevalent hospital infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance pattern against P. aeroginosa from clinical samples in our population. This study was performed during March 2009 to September 2011. During this period 233 clinical isolated samples from hospital patients were examined. In these studies, different strains of P. aeroginosa were isolated from samples, then microbiologically tested. Bacterial susceptibility was performed by the disc-diffusion tests with Kirby Baur disc diffusion tests in Muller-Hinto environment. Our results showed maximum antibiotic resistance (99.5%) of P. aeruginosa against Trimetoprime Solfametoxasole and Ciprofloxacin (55.33%), Amikacin (61%), Imipenem (33%), which were identified as the most effective antibiotics in this study. In conclusion, indeed most Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains infections are treated as soon as possible due to their severe resistance against antibiotics. So, we have to apply an accurate antibiotic treatment discipline, according to the finding, based on antibiogram, in order to prevent its spread and also, monitoring and optimization of antimicrobial use should be considered carefully.

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Rostamzadeh, Z. , Mohammadian, M. and Rostamzade, A. (2016) Investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Resistance Pattern against Antibiotics in Clinical Samples from Iranian Educational Hospital. Advances in Microbiology, 6, 190-194. doi: 10.4236/aim.2016.63019.

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