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Non Linear Electrodynamics Contributing to a Minimum Vacuum Energy (“Cosmological Constant”) Allowed in Early Universe Cosmology

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DOI: 10.4236/jhepgc.2016.21003    1,630 Downloads   2,030 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

This article poses the question of a minimum cosmological constant, i.e. vacuum energy at the start of the cosmological evolution from a near singularity. We pose this comparing formalism as given by Berry (1976) as to a small time length, and compare that in its entirety to compare this value given by Berry (1976) with a minimum time length at the start of cosmological space-time evolution. Using the methodology of Zeldovich (1972) as to a problem with electron-positron pair production we also propose another upper bound to the problem of minimum time length which may be accessible to experimental inquiry. This then makes the problem of minimum time length a way of specifying a magnetic field dependence of the cosmological constant, which has major implications to answering if quintessence, i.e. a changing cosmological vacuum energy, or a constant for the “cosmological constant” problem. Our answer is an initial value for the cosmological vacuum energy 1010 - 1020 times greater than today which suggests either Quintessence, or if still a constant, a much better value for this parameter than what is suggested by traditional field theory methods. In closing we review how our construct supports work done by Corda, as to early universe models and what the implications are, as to the choices we have made.

Cite this paper

Beckwith, A. (2016) Non Linear Electrodynamics Contributing to a Minimum Vacuum Energy (“Cosmological Constant”) Allowed in Early Universe Cosmology. Journal of High Energy Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology, 2, 25-32. doi: 10.4236/jhepgc.2016.21003.

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