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Impacts of waveforms on the fluid flow, wall shear stress, and flow distribution in cerebral aneurysms and the development of a universal reduced pressure

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DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2014.71002    5,095 Downloads   7,370 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

The hydrodynamics of aneurysm blood flow is thought to be a critical factor in the evolution and potential rupture of blood vessel walls. The ability to predict which aneurysms may grow or rupture has eluded researchers and practicing clinicians. On the other hand, it is expected that local flow patterns, pressures, and wall shear stress play a role in the aneurysm life. In this study, the impact of waveform on these parameters was studied. A baseline waveform, taken from a patient, was applied to an aneurysm geometry. Then the waveform was modified by increasing and decreasing both the flowrates and the cardiac rate. In total, seven cases were investigated. It was found that there were remarkable similarities in the patterns of flow and wall stresses for the cases. These similarities existed throughout the cardiac cycle. It was also found that there was a reduced pressure variable that provides a universal relationship that characterizes all of the cases. It was seen that the maximum wall shear occurs at the neck of the aneurysm and scales with the peak systolic velocity. Finally, it is shown that the flow distribution to the multiple outlets does not appreciably depend on the details of the inlet waveform. All cases had a flow distribution that was within 2%.

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Naughton, N. , Plourde, B. , Stark, J. , Hodis, S. and Abraham, J. (2014) Impacts of waveforms on the fluid flow, wall shear stress, and flow distribution in cerebral aneurysms and the development of a universal reduced pressure. Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, 7, 7-14. doi: 10.4236/jbise.2014.71002.

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