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Progress towards the Global Eradication of Dracunculiasis

DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1101696    618 Downloads   1,110 Views  

ABSTRACT

Dracunculus medinensis is a parasitic infection that can be prevented but still endemic in few countries today. Most individuals are not even aware that they are infected until when the symptoms develop. Contaminated drinking water, endemicity for the disease, and previous history of infection are the major risk factors for transmission of this disease. The Guinea worm’s life-cycle begins in contaminated water and ends within the human body. A host is necessary for the survival of this parasite. Symptoms do not develop until after about one year later. The overall infection process is very painful with a low mortality rate. The duration for treatment may take anywhere from hours, days, or weeks. Management of this parasitic infection is critical and can only be done after the worm has been completely removed. The incidence of the disease has decreased significantly since the 1980s. However, the complete eradication of Dracunculiasis has proven to be a very difficult process. Fortunately, there has been tremendous progress in the steps toward global eradication of the disease. There are several measures, such as surveillance, vector control, health education, provision of portable drinking water and community sensitization and mobilization which are currently being implemented by several governmental and non-governmental organizations in order to contain and hopefully eradicate the disease.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Sanyaolu, A. , Okorie, C. , Dixon, Y. , Kemajou, M. , Ly, K. , Mathew, E. , Nchamukong, J. , Nikookar, P. , Ogunjimi, R. , Patidar, R. , Sharma, S. and Woei, J. (2015) Progress towards the Global Eradication of Dracunculiasis. Open Access Library Journal, 2, 1-9. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1101696.

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