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A Classical Approach to the Modeling of Quantum Mass

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DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2013.411A1004    4,007 Downloads   5,761 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

In modern physics, a particle is regarded as the quantum excitation of a field. Then, where does the mass of a particle come from? According to the Standard Model, a particle acquires mass through its interaction with the Higgs field. The rest mass of a free particle is essentially identified from the Klein-Gordon equation (through its associated Lagrangian density). Recently it was reported that a key feature of this theory (i.e., prediction of Higgs boson) is supported by experiments conducted at LHC. Nevertheless, there are still many questions about the Higgs model. In this paper, we would like to explore a different approach based on more classical concepts. We think mass should be treated on the same footing as momentum and energy, and the definition of mass should be strictly based on its association with the momentum. By postulating that all particles in nature (including fermions and bosons) are excitation waves of the vacuum medium, we propose a simple wave equation for a free particle. We find that the rest mass of the particle is associated with a “transverse wave number”, and the Klein-Gordon equation can be derived from the general wave equation if one considers only the longitudinal component of the excitation wave. Implications of this model and its comparison with the Higgs model are discussed in this work.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

D. Chang, "A Classical Approach to the Modeling of Quantum Mass," Journal of Modern Physics, Vol. 4 No. 11A, 2013, pp. 21-30. doi: 10.4236/jmp.2013.411A1004.

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