Share This Article:

XLR: A Free Excel Add-In for Introductory Business Statistics

Abstract Full-Text HTML Download Download as PDF (Size:384KB) PP. 32-36
DOI: 10.4236/ojapps.2013.31B1007    4,082 Downloads   6,603 Views  
Author(s)    Leave a comment

ABSTRACT

XLR is an Excel add-in that unifies the user friendly, widely popular interface of Excel with the powerful and robust computational capability of the GNU statistical and graphical language R. The add-in attempts to address the American Statistical Association’s comment that “Generic packages such as Excel are not sufficient even for the teaching of statistics, let alone for research and consulting.” R is the program of choice for researchers in statistical methodology that is freely available under the Free Software Foundation’s GNU General Public License (GPL) Agreement. By wedding the interactive mode of Excel with the power of statistical computing of R, XLR provides a solution to the problem of numerical inaccuracy of using Excel and its various internal statistical functions and procedures by harnessing the computational power of R. XLR will be distributed under the GNU GPL Agreement. The GPL puts students, instructors and researchers in control of their usage of the software by providing them with the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software, thus, freeing them from the bondage of proprietary software. The creation of XLR will not only have a significant impact on the teaching of an Introductory Business Statistics course by providing a free alternative to the commercial proprietary software but also provide researchers in all disciplines who require sophisticated and cutting edge statistical and graphical procedures with a user-friendly interactive data analysis tool when the current set of available commands is expanded to include more advance procedures.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

P. Ng, "XLR: A Free Excel Add-In for Introductory Business Statistics," Open Journal of Applied Sciences, Vol. 3 No. 1B, 2013, pp. 32-36. doi: 10.4236/ojapps.2013.31B1007.

References

[1] P. C. Bell, “Teaching Business Statistics with Microsoft Excel,” INFORMS Transactions on Education, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2000, pp. 18-26. doi:10.1287/ited.1.1.18
[2] J. Garfield, B. Hogg, C. Schau and D. Whittinghill, “First Courses in Statistical Science: the Status of Educational Reform Efforts,” Journal of Statistics Education, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2002. http://www.amstat.org/publications/jse/v10n2/garfield.html
[3] T. E. Love and D. K. Hildenbrand, “Statistics Education and the Making Statistics More Effective in Schools of Business Conferences,” The American Statistician, Vol. 56, No. 2, 2002, pp. 107-112. doi:10.1198/000313002317572772
[4] ASA, “Guidelines for Programs and Departments in Undergraduate Mathematical Sciences,” American Statistical Association (ASA) Endorsement of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), 2000. http://www07.homepage.villanova.edu/michael.posner/sigmaastated/ASAendorsement2.html
[5] L. Knusel, “On the Accuracy of Statistical Distributions in Microsoft Excel 97,” Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 26, No. 3, 1998, pp. 375-377. doi:10.1016/S0167-9473(97)81756-2
[6] B. D. McCullough and D. A. Heiser, “On the accuracy of statistical procedures in Microsoft Excel 2007,” Computational Statistics & Data Anal-ysis, Vol. 52, No. 10, 2008, pp. 4570-4578. doi:10.1016/j.csda.2008.03.004
[7] B. D. McCullough and B. Wilson, “On the Accuracy of Statistical Procedures in Microsoft Excel 97,” Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Vol. 31, No. 3, 1999, pp. 27-37. doi:10.1016/S0167-9473(99)00004-3
[8] B. D. McCullough and B. Wilson, “On the Accuracy of Statistical Procedures in Microsoft Excel 2000 and Excel XP,” Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2002, pp. 713-721. doi:10.1016/S0167-9473(02)00095-6
[9] B. D. McCullough and B. Wilson, “On the accuracy of statistical procedures in Microsoft Excel 2003,” Computational Statistics & Data Anal-ysis, Vol. 49, No. 4, 2005, pp. 1244-1252. doi:10.1016/j.csda.2004.06.016
[10] J. Simonoff, “Statistical Analysis Using Microsoft Excel,”2005. http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jsimonof/classes/1305/pdf/excelreg.pdf
[11] N. Cox, “Use of Excel for Statistical Analysis,”2000. http://users.df.uba.ar/sgil/tutoriales1/fisica_tutoriales/data_analisis/Statistical_analysis.pdf
[12] J. D. Cryer, “Problems with Using Microsoft Excel for Statistics,” the Joint Statistical Meetings, American Statistical Association, 2001. http://www.stat.uiowa.edu/~jcryer/JSMTalk2001.pdf
[13] A. T. Yalta, “The Accuracy of Statistical Distributions in Microsoft Excel 2007,” Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 52, No. 10. 2008, pp. 4579-4586. doi:10.1016/j.csda.2008.03.005
[14] R. Core Team, “R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing,” R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria, 2012. http://www.R-project.org
[15] T. Baier and E. Neuwirth, “Excel::COM::R,” Computational Statistics, Vol. 22, No. 1, 2007, pp. 91-108. doi:10.1007/s00180-007-0023-6

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2018 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.