Share This Article:

Indigenous Peoples and the Capitalist World System: Researching, Knowing, and Promoting Social Justice

Abstract Full-Text HTML Download Download as PDF (Size:258KB) PP. 156-178
DOI: 10.4236/sm.2013.32023    3,051 Downloads   4,974 Views   Citations
Author(s)    Leave a comment

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the major consequences of the expansion of the European-dominated capitalist world system, colonial terrorism, and continued subjugation for indigenous Americans, Australians, and Africans between the late fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Western powers as well as most of the descendants of European colonialists in Europe, the Americas, Australia, and in Africa and their regional and local collaborators deny or forget or minimize the crimes committed against indigenous peoples and claim that their ancestors spread modernity and civilization around the world. Not recognizing these crimes and ignoring or forgetting or minimizing them have far reaching consequences for humanity and raise moral and ethical issues for the validity of modern civilization that claims to promote the principles of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, democracy, and social justice. The commitment to these principles and truly promoting them require reevaluating the past and present mistakes in the modern world system to openly and honestly debate them and seek correct and urgent solutions for the surviving indigenous peoples who are still suffering from state terrorism, massive human rights violations, dispossession of resources and rights, absolute poverty, disease, and illiteracy.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Jalata, A. (2013). Indigenous Peoples and the Capitalist World System: Researching, Knowing, and Promoting Social Justice. Sociology Mind, 3, 156-178. doi: 10.4236/sm.2013.32023.

References

[1] Algeria, R. (1997). The study of aboriginal peoples: Multiple ways of knowing. In S. M. Wilson (Ed.), The indigenous people of the Caribbean (pp. 9-19). Gainesville, FL: University of Florida.
[2] Baldwin, J. (1963). A talk to teachers. In R. Simonson, & S. Walker, (Eds.), Multiculturalism literacy (pp. 3-12). St. Paul, MN: Graywolf Press.
[3] Balibar, E., & Wallerstein, I. (1991). Race, nation, class: Ambiguous identities. New York: Verso.
[4] Brennan, W. (1995). Dehumanizing the vulnerable: When word games take lives. Chicago, IL: Loyola University Press.
[5] Black, D. (2004). The geometry of terrorism. Sociological Theory, 22, 14-25. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9558.2004.00201.x
[6] Blackhawk, N. (2006). Violence over the land: Indians and empires in the early American west. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[7] Blakeley, R. (2009). State terrorism and neoliberalism: The north in the south. New York: Routledge.
[8] Bodley, J. H. (1982). Victims of progress (3rd ed.). Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Co.
[9] Bodley, J. H. (1992). Anthropology and the politics of genocide. In N. Carolyn, & J. Martin (Eds.). The paths to domination, resistance and terror (pp. 37-51). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
[10] Burns, J. (1988). Canada tries to make restitution to its own. New York Times, 1 September 1992.
[11] Beyan, A. T. (2005). African American settlements in West Africa: John Brown Russwurm and the civilizing efforts. New York: Palgrave. doi:10.1057/9781403979193
[12] Birmingham, D. (1999). Portugal and Africa. New York: St. Martin’s Press, Inc.
[13] Birmingham, D. (2006). Empire in Africa: Angola and its neighbors. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press.
[14] Branche, R. (2004). Torture and other violations of the law by the French army during the Algerian War. In J. Adam (Ed.), Genocide, war crimes & the west (pp. 134-145). London: Zed Books,
[15] Boorstin, D. J. (1983). The discoverers: A history of man’s search to know his world and himself. New York: Random House Inc.
[16] Bulatovich, A. (2000). Ethiopia through Russian eyes: Country in transition, 1896-1898. Lawrenceville, NJ: The Red Sea Press.
[17] Broome, R. (2002). Aboriginal Australians: Black responses to white dominance (3rd ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin.
[18] Bourke, E. (1998). Images and realities. In B. Colin, E. Bourke, & B. Edwards (Eds.), Aboriginal Australia (pp. 1-15). Queensland: University of Queensland Press.
[19] Bourke, E. (1998). Australia’s first peoples: Identity and population. In B. Colin, E. Bourke, & B. Edwards (Eds.), Aboriginal Australia (pp. 38-55), St Lucia, QLD: University of Queensland Press.
[20] Bultin, N. G. (1993). Economics and the dreamtime: A hypothetical history. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.
[21] Cannon, M. (1993). Black land, White Land. Melbourne: Minerva.
[22] Carlson, J. D. (2001). Broadening and deepening: Systemic expansion, incorporation and the zone of ignorance. Journal of World-Systems Research, 2, 225-264.
[23] Carlson, J. D. (2002). The “otter-man” empires: The Pacific fur trade, incorporation and the zone of ignorance. Journal of World-Systems Research, 8, 390-442.
[24] Chase-Dunn, C. and Thomas D. H. (1997). Rise and demise: Comparing world-systems. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
[25] Chomsky, N. (1993). Years 5001: The conquest continues. Boston, MA: South End Press.
[26] Clegg III, C. A. (2004). The price of liberty: African Americans and the making of Liberia. Chapel Hill, CA: The University of North Carolina Press.
[27] Cohen, J. M. (1969). Christopher Columbus: The four voyages. London: Penguin Books.
[28] Colson, E. (1992). Conflict and violence. In C. Nordstrom, & J. Martin (Eds.), The paths to domination, resistance and terror (pp. 277-287). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press,
[29] Coquery-Vidrovitch, C. (1985). French Congo and Gabon, 1886-1905. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 298-315). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[30] Cranstone, B. A. L. (1973). The Australian aborigines. London: The Trustees of the British Museum.
[31] Cannon, M. (1993). Black land, white land. Melbourne: Minerva.
[32] Davidson, B. (1961). The African slave trade: Pre-colonial history 1450-1850. Boston, MA: The Atlantic Monthly Press.
[33] Davis, M. (2001). Late Victorian holocausts: El Nino famines and the making of the third world. London: Verso.
[34] De Las Casas, B. (1992). A short account of the destruction of the Indies. London: Penguin Books.
[35] De Las Casas, B. (1971). History of the Indies. New York: Harper & Row.
[36] De Salviac, M. (2005) An ancient people, great African nation. Michigan, MI: East Lansing.
[37] Debo, A. (1995). A History of the Indians of the United States. London: Pimlico Edition.
[38] Den Berghe, P. (1970). South Africa: A study in conflict. Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press.
[39] Deschamps, H. (1985). Madagascar and France, 1870-1907. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 298-315). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[40] Diamond, J. (1999). Guns, germs, and steel: The fates of human societies. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
[41] Dickson, O. P. (2002). Canada’s first nations (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
[42] Dickson, O. P. (2006). A concise history of Canada’s first nations. New York: Oxford University Press.
[43] Do Bois, W. E. B. (1977 [1935]). Black reconstruction. Cleveland, OH: World Meridian.
[44] Dunaway, W. A. (1996). The incorporation of mountain ecosystems into the capitalist world-system. Review, 19, 355-381.
[45] Elder, B. (1988). Blood on the wattle: Massacres and maltreatment of Australian aborigines since 1788. Sydney: New Holland.
[46] Elkins, C. (2005). Imperial reckoning: The untold story of Britain’s gulag in Kenya. New York: Henry Holt and Company.
[47] Elkin, A. P. (1951). Reaction and interaction: A food gathering people and European settlement in Australia. American Anthropologist, 53, 164-186.
[48] Evans, R., & Thrope, B. (2001). The massacre of aboriginal history. Overland, 163, 21-40.
[49] Falola, T. (2002). Key events in African history: A reference guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
[50] Fenn, E. A. (2000). Biological warfare in eighteenth-century North America. Journal of American History, 86, 552-558.
[51] Fenelon, J. V. (1997). From peripheral domination to internal colonialism: Socio-political change of the Lakota on standing rock. Journal of World-Systems Research, 3, 259-320.
[52] Fenelon, J. V. (1998). Culturicide, resistance, and survival of the lakota (“Sioux Nation”). New York: Garland Publishing, Inc.
[53] Ferguson, R. B., & Whitehead, N. L. (1992). War in the tribal zone. Santa Fe, NM: SAR Press.
[54] Freund, B. (1984). The making of contemporary Africa. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
[55] Ganiage, J. (1985). North Africa . In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 159-171). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[56] Gershoni, Y. (1985). Black colonialism: The Americo-Liberian scramble for the hinterland. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
[57] Gewald, J.-B. (2004). Imperial Germany and the herero of Southern Africa: Genocide and the quest for recompense. In J. Adam (Ed.). Genocide, war crimes & the west: History and complicity (pp. 59-77). London: Zed Books,
[58] Goodwin, J. (2006). A theory of categorical terrorism. Social Forces, 84, 2027-2046. doi:10.1353/sof.2006.0090
[59] Grant, K. (2005). A civilised savagery: Britain and the new slaveries in Africa, 1884-1926. New York: Routledge.
[60] Haebich, A. (2004). Clearing the wheat belt: Erasing the indigenous presence in the southwest of Western Australia. In A. D. Moses (Ed.), Genocide and settler society: Frontier violence and stolen indigenous children in Australian history (pp. 267-289). New York: Berghahn Books.
[61] Hall, T. D. (1996). The world-system perspective: A small sample from a large universe. Sociological Inquiry, 66, 440-454. doi:10.1111/j.1475-682X.1996.tb01186.x
[62] Hall, T. D. (1989). Social change in the southwest, 1350-1880. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
[63] Hall, T. D., & Fenelon, J. V. (2004). The futures of indigenous peoples: 9-11 and the trajectory of indigenous survival and resistance. Journal of World-Systems Research, 10, 153-197.
[64] Haraway, D. J. (1991). Simians, cyborgs, and women. New York: Routledge.
[65] Hargreaves, J. D. (1985). Western Africa, 1886-1905. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 259-279). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[66] Herbert, E. (2003). Small wars and skirmishes 1902-1918. Nottingham: Foundry Books.
[67] Hollis, S. A. (2005). Contact, incorporation, and the North American southeast. Journal of World-Systems Research, 11, 95-130.
[68] Hochschild, A. (1998). King Leopold’s ghost: A story of greed, terror, and heroism in Colonial Africa. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
[69] Holcomb, B., & Ibssa, S. (1990). The Invention of Ethiopia. Trenton, NJ: The Red Sea Press.
[70] Humbaraci, A., & Muchnik, N. (1974). Portugal’s African wars. New York: The Third Press.
[71] Hughes, R. (1987) The fatal shore. London: Random House Inc.
[72] Jalata, A. (2001). Fighting against the injustice of the state and globalization. New York: Palgrave.
[73] Jefferson, T. (1813). Alexander von Humboldt’s Correspondence with Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 103, 792-793.
[74] Josephy, Jr., & Alvin M., (1991). Introduction: The center of the universe. In American 1492: The world of the Indian peoples before the arrival of Columbus (pp. 3-19). New York: Vintage Books,
[75] Kiernan, B. (2007). Blood and soil: A world history of genocide and extermination from Sparta to Darfur. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
[76] Kiernan, V. G. (1982). From conquest to collapse: European empires from 1815-1960. New York: Pantheon Books.
[77] Kociumbas, J. (2004). Genocide and modernity in colonial Australia, 1788-1850. In A. D. Moses (Ed.), Genocide and settler society: Frontier violence and stolen indigenous children in Australian history (pp. 77-102). New York: Berghahn Books.
[78] Kociumbas, J. (2004). Genocide and modernity in colonial Australia, 1788-1850. In A. D. Moses (Ed.), Genocide and settler society: Frontier violence and stolen indigenous children in Australian history (pp. 77-102). New York: Berghahn Books.
[79] Loewen, J. W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me: Everything your American history textbook got wrong. New York: Touchstone.
[80] Lonsdale, J. (1985). The European scramble and conquest in African history. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 680-766). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[81] Magubane, B. (1996). The making of a racist state: British imperialism and the union of South Africa, 1875-1910. Trenton, NJ: The Red Sea Press.
[82] Magubane, B. (1979). The political economy of race and class in South Africa. New York: Monthly Review.
[83] Malik, K. (1996). The making of race. New York: New York University Press.
[84] Marks, S. (1985). Southern Africa, 1867-1886. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 359-421). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[85] Marx, K. (1967). Capital. New York: International Publishers.
[86] Metcalf, A. C. (2005). Go-between and the colonization of Brazil, 1500-1600. Austin: The University of Texas.
[87] Miller, J. C. (2002). West Africa. In The Atlantic slave trade (pp. 45-51). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company,.
[88] Moran, M. H. (2006). Liberia: The violence of democracy. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.
[89] Moses, A. D. (2004). Genocide and settler society: Frontier violence and stolen indigenous children in Australian history. New York: Berghahn Books.
[90] Mulvaney, J. (1981). Origins. In Aboriginal Australia. Sydney: Australian Gallery Directors Council.
[91] Mulvaney, D. J., & White J. P. (1987). Australians to 1788. Sydney: Fairfax, Syme & Weldon.
[92] Nevinson, H. W. (1906). A modern slavery. London: Haper & Brothers.
[93] Perdue, T. (2005). The cherokees: Indians of North America. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers.
[94] Person, Y. (1985). West Africa, 1870-1886. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 208-256). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[95] Perude, T., & Green, M. D. (2005). The cherokee removal: A brief history with documents (2nd ed.). New York: Bedford/St. Martins.
[96] Polanyi, K. (1944). The great transformation. Boston, MA: Beacon press.
[97] Prum, M., Deschamps, B., & Narie-Claude, B. (2007). Racial, ethnic, and homophobic violence: Killing in the name of otherness. New York: Taylor & Francis Group.
[98] Rahman, M. A. (1993). The theoretical standpoint of PAR [Participatory Action-Research]. In O. Fals-Borda, & M. A. Rahman (Eds.), Action and knoweldge: Breaking the monopoly with participatory action-research. New York: Apex Press.
[99] Rodney, W. (1972). How Europe underdeveloped Africa. Washington DC: Howard University Press.
[100] Roediger, D. R. (1991). The wages of whiteness. London: Verso.
[101] Rowley, C. D. (1972). The destruction of aboriginal society. Ringwood: VIC: Penguin.
[102] Sanderson, G. N. (1985). The European partition of Africa: Origins and dynamics. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 96-158). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[103] Schreuder, D. M. (1980).The Scramble for Southern Africa, 1877-1895: The politics of Partition reappraised. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[104] Sharlack, L. (2002). State rape: Sexual violence as genocide. In K. Worcester, S. A. Bermanzohn, & M. Ungar (Eds.), Violence and politics: Golobalization’s paradox. New York: Routledge.
[105] Shiva, V. (1997). Biopiracy: The plunder of nature and knowledge. Boston, MA: South End Press.
[106] Smith, A. (1985). Angola and Mozambique, 1870-1905. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 493-520). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[107] Stengers, J. (1985). King Leopold’s Congo, 1886-1908. In J. D. Fage, & R. Oliver (Eds.), The Cambridge history of Africa (pp. 315-358). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[108] Sturgis, A. H. (2007). The trail of tears and Indian removal. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
[109] Sundiata, I. (2003). Brothers and strangers: Black Zion, black slavery, 1914-1940. Durham: Duke University Press.
[110] Suret-Canale, J. (1964). French colonialism in tropical Africa 1900-1945. New York: Pica Press.
[111] Thrope, B. (1996). Colonial Queensland: Perspective on a frontier society. Birsbane: University of Queensland Press
[112] Theal, G. M. (1969). South Africa. New York: Negro Universities Press.
[113] Thompson, L. (2001). History of South Africa. New Heaven, CT: Yale University Press.
[114] Thompson, V., & Adloff, R. (1968). Djibouti and the Horn of Africa. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
[115] Thornton, J. (2002). Warfare and slavery. In D. Northrup (Ed.), The Atlantic slave trade (pp. 55-64). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company,.
[116] Tindale, N. B. (1974). Aboriginal tribes of Australia: Their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits and proper names. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
[117] Turok, B. and Maxey, K. (1985). Sothern Africa in crisis. In P. C. W. Gutkind, & I. Wallerstein(Eds.), Political economy of contemporary Africa (pp. 243-278). London: Sage Publications,.
[118] Tyler-McGraw, M. (2007). An African REPUBLIC: Black & White Virginians in the making of Liberia. Chapel Hill, CA: University of North Carolina Press.
[119] Vandervort, B. (1998). Wars of imperial conquest in Africa, 1830-1914. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
[120] Whitehead, N. L. (1993). Ethnic transformation and historical discontinuity in native Amazonia and Guayana, 1500-1900. L’Homme, 33, 285-305.
[121] Whitehead, N. L. (2004a). On the poetics of violence. In N. L. Whitehead (Ed.), Violence (pp. 55-77). Santa Fe, NM: School of American research Press.
[122] Whitehead, N. L. (2004b). Introduction: Cultures, conflicts, and the poetics of violent practice. In N. L. Whitehead (Ed.), Violence (pp. 3-24). Santa Fe, NM: School of American Research Press.
[123] Wilkinson, P. (1979). Social scientific theory and civil violence. In A. Yonah, D. Carlton, & P. Wilkinson (Eds.), Terrorism: Theory and practice (pp. 45-72). Boulder, CO: Westview Press
[124] Wilson, S. (1997). Introduction to the study of the indigenous people of the Caribbean. In S. M. Wilson (Ed.), The Indigenous people of the Caribbean (pp. 1-19). Gainesville, FL: University of Florida.
[125] Winant, H. (1994). Racial conditions. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.
[126] Wolf, E. (1981). Europe and the people without history. Berkeley, CA: University of California.
[127] Zimmeere, J. (2004). Colonialism and the holocaust: Towards a archeology of genocide. In A. D. Moses (Ed.), Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier violence and stolen indigenous children in Australian history (pp. 49-76). New York: Berghahn Books,
[128] Zinn, H. (2003). A people’s history of the United States: 1492-present. New York: Harper Collins Publishers.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2018 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.