Share This Article:

Occupational Fatalities Involving Hispanic Workers in the Construction Industry

DOI: 10.4236/ojsst.2013.31001    5,100 Downloads   8,336 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

This study examined occupational fatality cases involving Hispanic workers that occurred from 2005 to 2009 in the United States. During this period, approximately 26 percent of all fatalities in the construction industry involved Hispanic workers resulting in significantly greater odds for Hispanic workers of being the victim of an occupational fatality due to falls and contact with objects. These increased odds also occurred across most age groups. Prevention measures presented include focusing efforts on construction industry trades that employ younger Hispanic workers and expose them to fall and contact with objects hazards.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

C. Janicak, "Occupational Fatalities Involving Hispanic Workers in the Construction Industry," Open Journal of Safety Science and Technology, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2013, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.4236/ojsst.2013.31001.

References

[1] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Table 18. Employed Persons by Detailed Industry, Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Ethnicity, 2003,” Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 2003.
[2] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Table 18. Employed Persons by Detailed Industry, Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Ethnicity, 2010,” Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 2010.
[3] S. Richardson, “Fatal Work Injuries among Foreign-Born Hispanic Workers,” Monthly Labor Review, Vol. 128, No. 10, pp. 63-67.
[4] Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports, “Work-Related Injury Deaths among Hispanics-United States, 1992-2006,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports, Vol. 57, No. 2, 2008, pp. 597-600.
[5] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Fatal Occupational Injuries, Total Hours Worked, and Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries for Civilian Workers by Selected Worker Characteristics, Occupations, and Industries, 2009,” Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 2009.
[6] P. M. Goodrum and J. Dai, “Differences in Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Construction Workers,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 131, No. 9, 2005, pp. 1021-1028. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2005)131:9(1021)
[7] A. L. Acosta-Leon, B. P. Grote, S. Salem and N. Daraiseh, “Risk Factors Associated with Adverse Health and Safety Outcomes in the US Hispanic Workforce,” Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2006, pp. 299-310. doi:10.1080/14639220500090695
[8] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “BLS Spotlight on Statistics: National Hispanic Heritage Month,” 2012. http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2012/hispanic_heritage/pdf/hispanic_heritage_bls_spotlight.pdf
[9] A. M. Wendelboe and M. G. Landen, “Increased Fall-Related Mortality Rates in New Mexico, 1999-2005,” Public Health Reports, Vol. 126, 2011, pp. 861-867.
[10] A. P. C. Chan, F. Wong, D. Chan, M. Yam, A. Kwok, E. Lam and E. Cheung, “Work at Height Fatalities in the Repair, Maintenance, Alteration, and Addition Works,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 2008, Vol. 134, No. 7, pp. 527-535. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:7(527)
[11] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Charts, 1992-2010 (Preliminary Data),” 2011. http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm#charts
[12] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2010 (Preliminary Results),” News Release, August 25, 2011.
[13] Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Table 11. Employed Persons by Detailed Occupation, Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Ethnicity, 2010,” Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 2010.
[14] M. Norusis, “SPSS 14.0 Advanced Statistical Procedures Companion,” Prentice Hall, New York, 2005.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2019 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.