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Motivations and Barriers of the Model of Non-Traditional Market Economy: A Case to Study in BRICS

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DOI: 10.4236/me.2012.38115    4,823 Downloads   7,113 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Emerging economies including Brasil,Russia,India,ChinaandSouth Africaknown as a growing force with the power of economy, finance and enormous potentials are considered as massive motivations affecting greatly the rest parts of the entire world. Theirs characteristics of politics, political geography and economic policy are not identical to traditional market economies inEuropeand the U.S. BRICS can be called the model of non-traditional market economy.The rise and the great effect of BRICS can change the order of the current world which has long been dominated by western nations during the past 2 decades. However, BRICS itself contains challenges and barriers for the socio-economic development such as hot growth, poverty, low living standards and enviromental pollution, etc. The political affiliations and violence in declaring the sovereignty of seas, islands and territory reveal the latent unstability that can drive to conflicts and arms race, etc.Brics is a force without lack of necessary motivational factors that can enhance the development but also contain inside challenges and barriers for the rest parts of the modern world.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

N. Phat, "Motivations and Barriers of the Model of Non-Traditional Market Economy: A Case to Study in BRICS," Modern Economy, Vol. 3 No. 8, 2012, pp. 920-925. doi: 10.4236/me.2012.38115.

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