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Genoautotomy (Genome 'Self-Injury') in Eukaryotic Cells: A Cellular Defence Response to Genotoxic Stress

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DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1102946    652 Downloads   849 Views
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ABSTRACT

This paper proposes that eukaryotic cells, under severe genotoxic stress, can commit genoautotomy (genome “self-injury”) that involves cutting and releasing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragments from double-stranded DNA and leaving ssDNA gaps in the genome. The ssDNA gaps could be easily and precisely repaired later. The released ssDNA fragments may play some role in the regulation of cell cycle progression. Taken together, genoautotomy causes limited nonlethal DNA damage, but prevents the whole genome from lethal damage, and thus should be deemed as a eukaryotic cellular defence response to genotoxic stress.

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Li, G. (2016) Genoautotomy (Genome 'Self-Injury') in Eukaryotic Cells: A Cellular Defence Response to Genotoxic Stress. Open Access Library Journal, 3, 1-4. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1102946.

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